Category Archives: toastmasters

4 Things Tom Hanks does that they didn’t teach you in Toastmasters


I always thought Tom Hanks was a captivating speaker, but never analyzed carefully to figure out why. If you want to be a more interesting speaker, practice the 4 tips in this video. If you’re in toastmasters, you may have heard some of this, but not with this much detail (vocal variety, body language, eye contact) and there is more here that you might not have heard before:
1. story gap
2. emotional intrigue
3. inherit the character
4. audience inclusion

Watch it and tell me what you think in the comments. (disclaimer: I don’t know about or have anything to do with the promo at the end of the video.)

Also check out my analysis of how these unusual performers use body language and… the pause… to be more entertaining.

Worst (and best) Practices for Giving Online Speeches


If there is something people dread more than public speaking, it is probably speaking in front of a camera. But until we go back to meeting in person, we are stuck giving our speeches and presentations to a camera at home.

Unfortunately, being skilled at speaking to a live audience does not ensure you will be good at presenting to a camera. But with every challenge also comes opportunity. And by making a conscious effort to improve on camera, you will expand, refine, and diversify your speaking skills in more ways than you ever could by giving in-person speeches alone. Watch this speech to get some ideas:

Tips:
Bonus: Wash your hands for 20 seconds
1. Have a simple, uncluttered background
2. Dress as you would for an in-person speech
3. Mark where to stand with a towel (and be barefoot)
4. Look at the camera, not at the screen
…but don’t stare! Look away occasionally, more naturally
5. Study Late Night talk show hosts for examples
6. Sit 3-5 feet or stand 4-6 feet from the camera (where the front row would be sitting)
7. If presenting, consider standing instead of sitting
8. Move around the stage
9. Use body language, gestures and facial expressions
10. Even if you aren’t giving a speech, don’t put your camera down low!
11. Put the camera level with your eyes and tipped slightly down
12. Put the camera on a tripod or other stable support
13. Using your phone? Prop it on a box if you don’t have a tripod
14. ALWAYS use landscape (horizontal) orientation!
15. Have multiple light sources
16. Avoid bright light / windows behind you
17. Avoid harsh lighting / spotlights
18. Don’t stand too close to the wall
19. Only use virtual backgrounds if you must
20. Virtual backgrounds work best with a green screen
21. Simple, natural backgrounds are best
22. Stephen Colbert, Seth Meyers sit because they do a 1 hour show
23. Silence your cell phone and close all apps on your computer
24. Put pets and kids far, far away… Unless they are quiet like @FreddyTheBassett
25. Use an external microphone
26. Cell phone earbuds make good microphones
27. Be close to camera-mounted microphones
28. Soundcheck your audio before the meeting starts
29. Use fresh/fully charged batteries or plug into an outlet
30. Be in a quiet location
31. Close any windows during your speech
32. Join early to test audio, video, visual aids, timer
33. Pin the timer’s video AND have your own timer
34. Connect to the internet using a wire instead of wifi if possible

Watch what works well for others and try different things and have fun with this new platform for speaking! Be sure to check out the other Toastmasters tips I’ve posted by clicking the Toastmasters tab at the top of this page.

How to promote your club meeting on Facebook


This video demonstrates how to:
1.  Create a Facebook event.
2.  Simplify the steps to invite your friends to the event.
3.  Promote your event beyond the people you know.

For more Toastmasters tips, visit https://davidhablewitz.com/category/toastmasters/

How to Enable Breakout Rooms in Zoom


Breakout rooms are free in Zoom if you know how to enable them.
Watch this video to learn how.

 

Part 2: Using Zoom Virtual Backgrounds for Toastmasters Timer Role on iPads & Androids


I’ve gathered more information on this topic regarding iPads, Androids, and older PCs.

A few notes from the video:

  • The Zoom app on Android devices doesn’t have the Virtual Background function.
    You will need to use good old colored paper to indicate the colors.  Be sure to keep holding up each color until time to switch colors.  I have not yet tested this functionality in WebEx.
  • Some older or lower end models of PCs can’t handle the Virtual Background feature in Zoom.  I have not yet explored the details in WebEx.

Steps to add color cards as background images on the iPad:

  1. Visit http://bit.ly/timerbackgrounds
  2. Click each file one-by-one and download it to the iPad (don’t use the Download All)
  3. Open Downloads
  4. Tap the first file to open it, then tap it again to make it full screen.
  5. Take a screenshot (press the power button and the home button at the same time). This adds it to the photos which is where Zoom looks for background images.
  6. Repeat steps 4 & 5 for each photo
  7. Open Zoom.  Tap on the ellipsis (…) in the top right, then tap on Virtual Backgrounds
  8. Click the + icon at the bottom of the screen, then select the first image (white) to add it to the backgrounds.
  9. Repeat this for green, yellow and red in order.
  10. Leave this open while timing and choose NONE for your background between speeches, then choose WHITE when the speaker starts and GREEN, YELLOW, and RED at the appropriate times.

Please add comments with your own ideas or experiences with this process to make it better.  See more of my Toastmasters tips at https://davidhablewitz.com/category/toastmasters/

(See also Part 1: Using Backgrounds for Timer Role in Toastmasters Zoom Online Meetings

Part 1: Using Backgrounds for Timer Role in Toastmasters Zoom Online Meetings


There is a new trend to hold meetings online.  In particular, many Toastmasters clubs are moving to an online format as we wait for the pandemic to subside.  I have been working from home for about 8 years now and I have a few tips to improve your online meeting experience.  Today I will talk about how you can use the virtual background to enhance any presentation, but particularly if you are in the Timer role in your Toastmasters meeting.  This is specific to online meetings using Webex or Zoom.

  1.  Download the virtual background images from  http://bit.ly/timerbackgrounds
  2. Start / join your online meeting.
  3. Add the images to your available virtual backgrounds.
  4. Before the speech starts, cover your camera lens.
  5. Change your background at the appropriate time for each speech:
    Use None before/after the speech
    Use White (Timing…) when timing is started,
    Use the standard Green, Yellow, Red at the appropriate time

The purpose of covering your camera is so that your image isn’t distracting the speaker in front of the background image.  You will note that there are 4  virtual background images.  Be sure to use the White background when the speaker starts talking so everyone knows you have started timing.  Optionally you can type “Started”, “Green”, “Yellow”, “Red” in the meeting chat so that the audience knows without looking at your video where the timing is.  This should NOT be done during a contest.

For maximum visibility, if you have additional ideas for improving this procedure, please post your comments here rather than in Facebook or youtube.

Toastmasters meetings online is a great way to practice for using web meetings in other settings.  Explore other ways you can use these techniques to enhance your viewers’ online experience.  For more Toastmasters tips, visit
https://davidhablewitz.com/category/toastmasters/

(See also the second article I published on this which has more tips on the limitations of Virtual Backgrounds and how to use it on other devices:
Part 2: Using Zoom Virtual Backgrounds for Toastmasters Timer Role on iPads & Androids

Toastmasters: What these Musician-Actors Can Teach About BodY LaNGuaGE and… the Pause


Study this video to learn there is no limit to how much you can enhance your speech with body language:

And watch this video (starting at 3:07) to see just how much difference a well-placed pause…  can make in your speech.  Notice when the biggest laughs come.  Imagine replacing the beat with words and make your speech much more humorous with nothing more than………….a pause.

Public Speaking 101: stage use – Stage Left & Stage Right


Many beginner Toastmasters see their speech from their own point of view, both in how they talk and how they use the stage.  With practice, speakers learn to see and hear (and deliver) their speech considering the audience’s point of view.  Before explaining how that works, it is helpful to understand the terminology.
Stage Left  &  Stage Right
House Right  &  House Left
The term “House” or “Stage” is in reference to what you are looking at.  So if you’re in the audience, you are looking at the stage.  If you’re on stage, you’re looking at the house.  (And if you’re one of my whitewater paddling friends, you already know River Left and River Right is the perspective as you look down river.)  Here is a video explaining it:

Read the full article about it here.

Now how do you use this info?  Most cultures read from left to right and observe the passage of time going from left to right.  So for clarity to your audience your story should follow that flow.  So if you are talking about an event that came first, you would stand or point to Stage Left.  As you refer to events through time, you move across the stage to Stage Right.  You may make several trips through time this way and your story may come to a conclusion in the present which you would come back to front and center to deliver final the message.

How to Win (or Judge) a Toastmasters Speech Evaluation Contest


Joining Toastmasters and speaking in front of members of your club can be intimidating.  So the thought of competing in front of strangers who are judging your performance can be downright terrifying.  Many Toastmasters would never even consider competing.  It is easy to forget that Toastmasters is a safe place to fail, not just in front of your friends in your own club, but in the company of Toastmasters everywhere in any Toastmasters setting.  The value of competing is in stepping further outside your comfort zone, experiencing the success of speaking to perform, and meeting people from other clubs who have the same goals.

It is not that only the best speakers compete, but rather
those who compete become the best speakers.

The following video is a speech I delivered at Willows Voices Toastmasters on 2/1/2019 giving a bit of insight into my experience competing and a few tips on the evaluation contest.  But whether you are competing in the Speech Evaluation, Table Topics, Humorous Speech, or International Speech, there is value in watching this short presentation.

Here are the links referenced in the video:
Judge’s Ballot for Evaluation Contest: http://bit.ly/evaluationballot
Toastmasters.org videos on judging contests:  http://bit.ly/judgingspeeches
July 2018- June 2019 Contest Rulebook: http://bit.ly/2018-2019rulebook

People often assume that the contests are only for those who are good speakers.  Au Contraire!  It is not that only the best speakers compete, but rather those who compete become the best speakers.

Everything you want to know about Toastmasters Pathways is at this interactive website


Discovery! Leave it to the Toastmasters district headquartered in Silicon Valley to come up with a website that tells everything you could want to know about the new Pathways education program in Toastmasters.  Thank you District 4 (San Francisco/Palo Alto)

toastmasters-banner-v2

Start Here.  Go ahead, It will open in another window. I’ll wait here.
As you go through the information, everything about Pathways will become clear.
Of all the resources on that page, this one is the heart of it all.  Once there, click on one of the paths and then surf through the tabs of each project level and under each level, click through the projects.  It’s all there! Every project description.  This will help you choose your path.  When you click on this link, I expect you’ll get too caught up in it to return here, so enjoy.  Bookmark that page or come back here and click on the Toastmasters Resources I will be adding to the menu.  Other handy resources they have list are:

Pathways Resources

 

Why Attend this TED style 1-day conference hosted by Toastmasters? …


To learn from this amazing speaker and World Champion of Public Speaking for one.

If you know a CEO, manager, supervisor or friend who could benefit from learning better leadership or public speaking skills, you might ask them to consider coming to this event in Lynnwood, WA.  Suggesting they attend may be like telling a friend they have bad breath: Once they get over the embarrassment, they will thank you for it.
This 1-day conference on leadership and public speaking is good enough that you won’t care how nice the weather is outside.  Seriously.  No, I’m not getting paid to say that.  I’ve just attended in the past and I know how good the presenters are.  It made a huge difference in my presentation at IBM Think Conference last month.

Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Toastmasters Pathways Program(updated 2018-Mar-26)


Have you signed up for the new Pathways program yet?  Did you already choose a path and start preparing to do your Ice Breaker speech?  You might even intend to be the first person to complete DTM under the new program, yes?

On the other hand, are you one who might be stuck trying to decide which pathway to select?  Wondering — maybe fearing even — what projects await when you commit to a choice and unlock your first Pathway; uncertain if it is really the right one for you? No worries, I have what you are looking for.  Read on.

Right about now you may feel as if you’ve been thrown into the movie “Divergent” and now you must choose what faction you will join, hmm?

Or like the young wizard Harry Potter, you don the sorting hat at Hogwarts School of Wizardry whispering “Gryffindore? Hufflepuff? Ravenclaw? Slytherin?”

Some Toastmasters may find solace that during the first 30 days after you have selected a Pathway, you can change your selection.  But that doesn’t make it easier to decide which path to choose and it doesn’t help understand what each pathway contains. For that matter, having 30 days to switch doesn’t really help because you can’t see what all of the projects are that lie ahead.  You can only see the projects of the current level you are on.  The projects for the next level are not revealed until you complete the projects of the level your are on and unlock the next level (and your Vice President of Education has processed it.)  This can be quite frustrating for those of us who thrive on seeing the “big picture”.  As Morpheus explains it in The Matrix…

Not being one to accept artificial limitations imposed by others, I set out to discover what I could about each pathway in the new Pathways program.  And for the sake of my fellow Toastmasters who demand to know more, I will share with you what I have discovered.

Toastmasters has published these descriptions of the 10 pathways:
You might also read this guide that was published.

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________

Within each pathway there are 5 levels.  Applying the gaming metaphor to this (and yes, Pathways is definitely the gamification of the Toastmasters program), each level has several missions (projects) to complete before unlocking access to the next level.  Each level has a mix of mandatory and elective missions to be completed.  The details are as follows:

Level 1:  3 Required missions (projects) – These are the same for all paths
Level 2:  3 Required missions – These vary by path
Level 3:  1 Required mission and choose 2 electives
Level 4:  1 Required mission and choose 1 elective
Level 5:  2 Required missions and choose 1 elective

That is a total of 14 missions to complete to finish a pathway.
Complete 2 pathways to earn DTM.
Special thanks to Frank T. Storey, DTM from District 18.
Checkout his website for comprehensive more info.  It even shows all 59 projects currently available.  Scroll to the bottom of this page and view the .PDFs 1-4 posted.  I would link them directly here, but he is constantly updating them.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

The following table contains a list of the mission titles and which Pathway each applies to.  Special thanks to Ann DeMarrais and Kenneth Karru-Olsen for their work compiling this list!

projectsPage1
projectsPage2

Hopefully this offers a bit of help in deciding which pathway to take.  The differences between the various pathways does not appear to be as significant as I had expected.  Yes, it would be nice to have more details of each project, but at least this is a start.  I will post more details as I find it.  I encourage you to share the link to this article and to post what you have learned about Pathways in the comments below.

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